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Headline Industry News

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Where fashion meets technology (part II)
Where fashion meets technology (part II)
Where fashion meets technology (part II)

04.06Where fashion meets technology (part II)

Circular economy is a system that illustrates the continuous flow of technological and biological materials through the “cycle of life”. It’s a system aiming for zero waste and 100% reuse of materials. 

With the progress in the field of materials and tech development, the recycling process is becoming more and more complicated as it isn’t going as fast as the development. Nevertheless some companies continue to introduce new technologies to the recycling industry in order  to speed up the switch to circular, zero waste economy. The aim is to have the recycled materials behave as the original ones.  

Every year we are producing millions of tones of new polyester and cotton to make our clothing and textiles. Worn Again is an English company that was founded in 2005 and had developed a “trail-blazing textile to textile recycling technology that can separate and recapture polyester and cotton from discarded, low-value clothing to produce virgin-equivalent, cost competitive polyester and cellulosic raw materials to go back into the supply chain as part of a continual process”. Polyester is harmful to the environment because it is made out of oil as for cotton it requires a large amount of water, land and pesticides to produce. What makes the process established by Worn Again unique is the fact that they can produce 2 pure outputs which presents an obvious economic advantage.

EVRNU is an American company also worried about the quantity of textile waste that ends up in the landfills and about the amount of water used in garment production. It takes approximately 700 gallons of water to create just one cotton t-shirt. The company introduced a steps process to create recyclable textiles. Firstly the garment waste is collected, sorted and separated then it is purified, shredded and turned into a pulp. From the pulp they extrude cellulose that creates a fiber finer than silk but stronger than cotton. And finally the fiber is spun into a yarn that can be used for garment and fabric production. There is no such thing as 100% sustainable production yet but aiming responsible innovation is aiming sustainable future.

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